mandrixx.net

‘chinese Food’ Song Deemed Offensive, Viral Video Producer Responds

“We know we made the right choice,” Walmart spokesman Kory Lundberg told ABCNews.com today. The chain has no regrets even though Louisiana’s Department of Children and Family Services said food stamp recipients should have been limited to $50 each during the emergency and that Walmart will have to pay the difference. Lundberg declined to comment about how much the company may have lost or why it did not follow the emergency $50 limit. Read More: Walmart to Get Stuck With Most of Food Stamp Shopping Spree Courtesy KSLA.com Shelves in the Walmart store in Springhill, La., were cleared Saturday, when the store allowed purchases on EBT cards that didn’t show limits. Another Walmart spokeswoman Kayla Whaling said, “Our focus was to continue serving our customers.” Food stamp recipients jammed into Walmarts in Mansfield and Springhill Saturday when word of the glitch spread. Springhill Police Chief Will Lynd said some customers were buying eight to ten grocery carts full of food. The store in Mansfield temporarily closed because of overcrowding and Mansfield Chief of Police Gary Hobbs said some shoppers left with up to eight carts of food and then went back for more. The food shelves were left bare and all the meat was sold as well, Lynd said. The shopping frenzy was triggered when the Electronic Benefits Transfer system went down because a back-up generator failed at 11 a.m. EST Saturday during a regularly-scheduled test, according to Xerox, a vendor for the EBT system and based in Norwalk, Conn. The outage erased limits on the EBT cards.

Walmart Says Food Stamp Shopping Spree Was ‘Right Choice’

REACT View Photo ‘Chinese Food’ Song Deemed Offensive, The mastermind behind the infamous, yet super-viral, Rebecca Black “Friday” song unleashed a new song, “Chinese Food,” this week that instantly became another Internet sensation. But it’s controversial this time, with some claiming the song is offensive because of its overt use of stereotypes. Ark Music Factory co-founder Patrice Wilson, who wrote and produced “Friday,” which now has more than 220 million views on YouTube, created the song, “Chinese Food,” which features 11-year-old Alison Gold’s singing about the Chinese food dishes she loves to eat after a night of hitting the club. The Los Angeles-based production company is known for its sassy, tongue-in-cheek, teeny pop tunes. Wilson has also found success with his “It’s Thanksgiving” song from teen singer Nicole Westbrook. But the imagery used in the “Chinese Food” music video, which was posted on YouTube three days ago and already has more than 7 million views, has some crying foul. With lyrics like, “I love Chinese food. You know that it’s true. I love fried rice, I love noodles, I love chow mein, chow m-m-m-mein,” Alison and other young girls in the video are seen dressed in geisha garb – even though geisha is from Japanese culture. In another scene, they are playing Monopoly to the tune of “I like Chinese food and some wanton soup. Get me broccoli while I play Monopoly.” The camera zooms in on a dog figurine on Oriental Avenue on a Monopoly board. In another scene, Alison is frolicking through a field with Wilson, in a giant panda suit, by her side.